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Transportation Division
Transportation Division

Residential Preferential Parking (RPP) Permits

The City of Berkeley prioritizes parking for residents in many of the city’s neighborhoods. The Residential Preferential Parking (RPP) Program began in 1980 to:

• Protect Berkeley residential neighborhoods from an influx of non-resident vehicles and related traffic;
• Assure continued quality of life for residents; and
• Provide neighborhood parking for residents.

The RPP Program limits parking for vehicles not displaying an RPP permit in most RPP areas to two hours, and reserves available daytime parking for residents, between 9:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. Monday through Friday, and on some blocks Saturday.  

For more information, please visit hte RPP Program Information page or contact Finance Customer Service at (510) 981-7200.  

 How Does a Street get RPP Designation?

The opt-in process consists of a petition campaign initiated by residents, a parking survey conducted by City staff, and a public hearing held at a City Council meeting. If approved, residents will be able to purchase RPP permits.
The Traffic Engineer’s Office has designated 16 RPP permit zones for City of Berkeley neighborhoods.   Please view the Berkeley RPP Zone Map to see if your street is with in a designated zone.   Streets within a designated  RPP zone can opt into the program by petitioning the Traffic Engineer with at least 51% of the residential addresses signing an official City of Berkeley RPP petition form.  A parking survey will be conducted to assess whether parking congestion exceeds 75% of the available spaces in the area.  Council approval is necessary to revise the streets included in the RPP program.

The full process includes:

1. Resident obtains petition forms from the City. Residents in eligible zones should contact Matt Cotterill at mcotterill@cityofberkeley.info or 510-981-6433 to request a petition form and begin the opt-in process.
2. Resident gathers signatures from neighbors. The petitioner is required to collect signatures from over half (51% or greater) of the eligible residential housing units in that area proposed to be included in the RPP Program. Only one signature per address will be counted. The petition may include a single blockface, defined as one side of one block,*  or may include additional contiguous blockfaces or full contiguous blocks within the same zone as the petitioner. The petition must be circulated and submitted by a resident of the petitioning block(s). Staff will designate the scope of the petition area before petitioning begins.
3. Resident submits the completed petition to the City. Residents will be in contact with Matt Cotterill (contact information above) throughout the opt-in process.
4. City staff conducts a parking survey. By law, a blockface is only eligible for RPP parking restrictions if it can be shown that parking is difficult to find at certain times of the day. City staff will perform a parking occupancy survey during two one-hour periods between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. If 75% or more of all parking spaces within the proposed RPP area are occupied, then the area is deemed eligible for RPP and the process continues.
5. Staff develops a recommendation for the Berkeley City Council. Staff will submit a report recommending that City Council pass a Resolution to add the proposed blockface(s) to the RPP Program.
6. The Berkeley City Council holds a Public Hearing. The Public Hearing is an opportunity for members of the public to comment on the proposed expansion of the RPP Program. At its conclusion, the Council will vote on whether to accept the recommendation, and amend the Berkeley Municipal Code to include new blockface(s) in the Program.
7. City installs signs and enforcement begins.  The City notifies affected neighbors in writing, informing them where to purchase their permits and when enforcement will begin.

How do I know if my street has already opted into the program?

The maps linked below show residential parcels on the streets that have already opted into the RPP Program. If your parcel is highlighted in the map, you may currently be eligible to purchase a permit for that zone. Please note that these maps are provided only as a reference guide and are not guaranteed to be accurate. For example, some parcels may contain both eligible and non-eligible addresses. For more questions about eligibility, please contact the Finance Customer Service Center at 1947 Center Street, 1st Floor, Berkeley, CA 94704, or call (510) 981-7200.

 

Who is eligible for the RPP Program in Mixed Use-Residential areas?

In the MU-R area, only residents living in housing units that have an Alameda County Property Tax Assessor’s residential “use code” are eligible to opt into the RPP Program. 

 

How do residents in the West Berkeley Mixed Use-Residential area opt into the RPP Program?

The process includes:  

  1. Resident obtains petition forms from the City. Residents should contact Matt Cotterill at mcotterill@cityofberkeley.info or 510-981-6433 to request a petition form and begin the opt-in process.
  2. Resident gathers signatures from residential neighbors. At a minimum, RPP parking restrictions in mixed use areas may be implemented on a portion of a single blockface, defined as one side of one block,* though a single petition may include additional continguous blockfaces.
    • The petition must come from a resident in the proposed RPP area, defined as someone living in a housing unit with a residential Alameda County Assessor’s “use code.”
    • The petitioner must confirm that over half (51% or greater) of the housing units on each blockface proposed for the RPP Program have an address with a residential Alameda County Assessor’s use code. If fewer than half of housing units on a blockface have residential use codes, then the petition will not be considered valid.
    • The petitioner is required to collect signatures from over half (51% or greater) of the eligible residential housing units in the area proposing to opt into the RPP Program. Only one signature per address will be counted.   
  3. Resident submits the completed petition to the City. Residents will be in contact with Matt Cotterill (contact information above) throughout the opt-in process.
  4. City staff conducts a parking survey. By law, a blockface is only eligible for RPP parking restrictions if it can be shown that parking is difficult to find at certain times of the day. City staff will perform a parking occupancy survey during two one-hour periods between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. If 75% or more of all parking spaces within the proposed RPP area are occupied, then the area is deemed eligible for RPP and the process continues.
  5. Staff develops a recommendation for the Berkeley City Council. Staff will submit a report recommending that City Council pass a Resolution to add the proposed blockface(s) to the RPP Program.
  6. The Berkeley City Council holds a Public Hearing. The Public Hearing is an opportunity for members of the public to comment on the proposed expansion of the RPP Program. At its conclusion, the Council will vote on whether to accept the recommendation, and amend the Berkeley Municipal Code to include new blockface(s) in the Program.
  7. If approved, City staff discusses how to best manage curb parking for non-residential users. Due to the variety of parking users in Mixed Use-Residential areas, RPP restrictions will only be applied on portions of blockfaces adjacent to residential parcels. Once an opt-in petition is approved by the City Council, staff will reach out to surrounding non-residential uses to discuss the best way to manage remaining curb parking on the blockface, including leaving the parking unregulated, installing parking meters, or adding time limits.
  8. City installs signs and enforcement begins. The City notifies affected neighbors in writing, informing them where to purchase their permits and when enforcement will begin.

   

What will RPP look like in the Mixed Use-Residential zone?

MU-R areas are unique to the City, unlike more uniformly residential areas where the RPP Program currently exists. Therefore, RPP would look slightly different in the proposed MU-R area. Because MU-R areas host a variety of different users who rely on curb parking, RPP curb restrictions in the MU-R area would only be implemented where requested and needed, leaving portions of curb space adjacent to non-residential uses open to all users. In some particularly impacted commercial areas, parking meters may be used to increase parking availability pending further study.



 *For example, the south side of Center Street between Milvia Street and Shattuck Avenue.

 

 

 
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Transportation Division, 1947 Center Street, 4th Floor, Berkeley, CA 94704
Questions or comments? Email: transportation@cityofberkeley.info Phone: (510) 981-7010
(510) 981-CITY/2489 or 311 from any landline in Berkeley
TTY: (510) 981-6903
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